Amid pandemic easing, Olango Wildlife Sanctuary reopens

Amid pandemic easing, Olango Wildlife Sanctuary reopens

By Junex Doronio

LAPU-LAPU CITY, Cebu – Reeling from the onslaught of supertyphoon Odette, residents of Olango island have expressed hopes to slowly get back on their feet again with the reopening of the world-famous Olango Wildlife Sanctuary amid the easing of the novel coronavirus disease (Covid-19) pandemic.

The Olango Wildlife Sanctuary serves as a paradise for the birds that fly back and forth to places such as Siberia, Northern China, Japan, and South Korea trying to “get warm” after the winter seasons.

“Hinaot unta nga modagsa ang mga turista aron naa na sab mi panginabuhian. Pait kaayo ang among kinabuhi tungod sa pandemya ug nisamot pa human nihapak ang bagyong Odette (We hope that many tourists will come so we can have our livelihood again. We really suffer much due to the pandemic and worse when typhoon Odette struck),” the residents told Maharlika TV.

Eight barangays in the island of Olango are under the jurisdiction of this city and most houses were destroyed and plunged into total darkness when supertyphoon Odette struck on December 16 last year.

The residents said the reopening of the wildlife sanctuary would further boost the island’s tourism industry and provide additional income to their families.

Lapu-Lapu City has eight barangays on the island of Olango where most houses were destroyed and plunged into total darkness when supertyphoon Odette struck on December 16 last year.

It was learned that there are more than one species of birds being observed in Olango Sanctuary. About 48 of them are migratory birds while the remaining number comprises the residents on this haven.

The website of Olango Island Wildlife Sanctuary identified some of the birds as the Chinese Egret, Little Egret, Little Heron, Grey Plover, Kentish Plover, Greater Sand-Plover, Far Eastern Curlew, Eurasian Curlew, Whimbrel, Bar-tailed Godwit, Common Redshank, Common Greenshank, Common Sandpiper, Terek Sandpiper, Grey-tailed Tattler, Ruddy Turnstone, Asian Dowitcher, Great Knot, Rufous-necked Stint, Curlew Sandpiper, Gull-billed Tern, Whiskered Tern, Common Kingfisher, White-collared Kingfisher, Barn Swallow, Pacific Swallow, Yellow-vented Bulbul, Golden-bellied Flyeater, Pied Fantail, Brown Shrike, and Olive-backed Sunbird. (ai/mtvn)

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